Sale 18818
Sculpted by Nature: Fossils, Minerals and Meteorites
Online 4 - 21 May 2020

Labradorite is a Feldspar mineral boasting a diverse specturm of colour thanks to their varying chemical composition of calcium and sodium. The name derives from where the first specimens were discovered – within the Labrador Peninsula, Canada – but fine examples of this mineral can be found most notably in Madagascar, China, and the United States.
First coined by Ove Balthasar Bøggild in 1924, ‘Labradorescence’ was the reflection of light across multiple directional planes, which cannot be viewed from a single angle nor under a microscope. Whether in free-form, sliced or spherical form, polished Labrodorite under the right light conditions reveals a beautiful array iridescence including blues, yellows, silvers and greens. When a specimen exhibits and richer and even rainbow-coloured iridescence (an even rarer occurrence almost exclusively mined in Finland), the mineral is then classed as a Spectrolite.
The colouration of Labradorite was considered so mesmerising in some Native American and Inuit traditions, that it was perceived to be the petrified fire produced by the Northern Lights (aurora borealis). Now known to have gradually formed from crystallised veins of magma, such specimens are still renowned to this day for their free-form shapes and extremely decorative hues.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
Bøggild, O.B., ‘On the Labradorization of the Feldspars’, Kongelige Danske Videnskabernes Selskab, Mathematisk-fysiske Meddelelelser, Series 6, Vol.3 (1924), pp.1–79
Post Lot Text
This lot has been imported from outside the EU for sale and placed under the Temporary Admission regime. Import VAT is payable (at 5%) on the hammer price. VAT at 20% will be added to the buyer’s premium but will not be shown separately on the invoice. Please see the Conditions of Sale for further information.

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This lot is offered by Christie Manson & Woods Ltd